In addition to the virtual workshops listed below, you can watch a previously recorded workshop, one of OIT’s many informative webinars available on the Keep Working website or participate in the events that will be part of the Faculty Advancement and Success (FAS) Workshop Series 2020–2021.

Gradescope is also offering weekly “getting started” workshops.

The recordings from these sessions may be made public.


Gradescope Advanced Q&A

Friday, January 15, 12-1 p.m. EST
Join experts from Gradescope to get answers to your more advanced Gradescope questions. If you’re trying to do more complex things with Gradescope, or have a need you haven’t been able to figure out how to handle with Gradescope, this is the session for you.

NOTE: This is not a basic Gradescope training session; attendees should already have used Gradescope in at least one class and have experience with the basics of collecting and grading student assignments in Gradescope. If you are new to Gradescope and would like Getting Started training, please see a list of training sessions.  

Designing an effective writing-intensive course

Tuesday, January 19, 10-11:30 a.m. EST
What’s expected in a course coded as “writing intensive”? How can you meet those expectations in your course? This session explores a variety of approaches to teaching a writing-intensive course—from multiple, smaller writing tasks to semester-long research projects. Topics include choosing writing assignments that fit the course structure, helping students learn about writing in your discipline, using peer feedback, deciding whether to assign multiple drafts, balancing course content and attention to writing.

This event is part of the Pedagogy Workshop Series hosted by the Writing in the Disciplines through the Thompson Writing Program.

Activating Annotation in Sakai

Thursday, January 21, 2 p.m. EST
This workshop will focus on how collaborative annotation with Hypothesis can be used to make student reading active, visible and social. The Hypothesis team will share how teachers are using annotation-powered reading to help students develop foundational academic skills like deep reading and persuasive writing. In addition to sharing pedagogical best practices for collaborative annotation, our team will demonstrate how Hypothesis is used with course readings in Sakai. Participants can expect to come away from this session with a clear idea of how to start incorporating collaborative annotation into their courses to improve student outcomes.

This event is run by the Hypothes.is for instructors at institutions that have integrated Hypothes.is with Sakai.

Crafting Effective Writing Assignments (C1)

Monday, January 25, 10-11:30 a.m. EST
How you articulate a writing task can have a large impact on what your students do and what they learn. Topics for this session include setting expectations, selecting an appropriate genre and audience for student writing, helping students identify a meaningful and manageable writing project.   

This event is part of the Pedagogy Workshop Series hosted by the Writing in the Disciplines through the Thompson Writing Program.

FAS 8: Engaging in Difficult Conversations

Wednesday, January 27, 10-11:30 a.m. EST
Learn how to engage in challenging conversations constructively.  Participants will learn skills for: handling personnel matters with fairness and professionalism; and tools for resolving broken commitments and bad behavior. This interactive session focuses on skill development and practice with peers through discussion of scenarios.

Moderator: Claudia Gunsch, Associate Vice Provost for Faculty Advancement and Theodore Kennedy Professor

This event is part of the Faculty Advancement and Success (FAS) Workshop Series 2020–2021.